PRIMO BASKETBALL CONTENT
Personal Pan Power Rankings #2 is second in a series of pizza topping- and NBA-themed power rankings. A Personal Pan ‘Za only has four slices, probably (has an adult ever ordered one? I’m trying to remember my childhood), so this feature ranks only four things.
Personal Pan Power Rankings #1
#4: Blake Griffin’s Use of the Rim on Reverse Layups
Though he’s technically a big man, Lake Griffin is so athletic that it seems at least once a game he reverse-lays the ball up like a guard or wing would—flying under the rim, baseline, and then hanging in the air so long that he rotates such that he’s facing the rim before putting it in. The acrobatics are necessary because he has to avoid getting blocked, because of his short arms, and possible, because of his absurd leaping and body control. 
Griffin’s height and length in proportion to his leaping and athleticism are like the Golden ratio. He is one of the most aesthetically pleasing players because his physical attributes are just small enough (he’s really a little undersized as a 4) to make his aerial moves look impressive. At the same time, Blake has the body control of, say, Monta Ellis (well, maybe not quite) and his height is enough to allow him to do things a player with that kind of body control (usually a little guy) so rarely does.
Perfectly Proportionate Pizza Topping Flavors: Peppers and Onions
#3: Steve Nash’s All-Star Selection
As of right now (11 Feb), Nash is actually closer to a 60-50-90 season than he is a 50-40-90.
Leads the league in assists. 
His fellow starters are Gortat, Dudley, Hill, and Frye. Without Nash, that team’s…I’m not even going to finish. 
Still a classic a pizza: Pepperoni
#2: Mo Williams’s Desire for a Contract Extension
Mo Williams is agitating for a contract extension. He is signed through next season. 
This year Mo Gotti’s acting like he only has a few years to live, like he can’t achieve his goals quick enough. When he gets into the game, he tries to shoot as many times as he can. When he feels like he’s not in shape, he drops 20 pounds even though now he looks unhealthy. When he agitates for a contract extension, he does it the year before his contract year.
How can anyone blame Mo for becoming a super go-getter? 
Pizza for highly effective people: None, they probably eat salads and grilled chicken
#1: The Clippers’ Using Dribble-Drive Offense Principles
With about 11 seconds to go in the first quarter against the Cavs (8 Feb), Mo Williams (on the right) and Blake Griffin (on the left) set up above the three point line while Gomes, Foye and Evans stood out of the way on the baseline (Gomes and Foye spotted up in the corners, Evans on the left a outside the paint). Antawn Jamison played off Griffin and was set up on the free throw line. Mo dribbled hard middle directly at Jamison to create a three man cluster at the FT line (Mo, Jamison, and Mo’s man, Ramon Sessions). Right after Mo started his drive, Blake broke toward the same area but stayed a few feet behind; Mo hit him with a bounce pass. Sessions couldn’t switch on to Griffin because his momentum, hips, and shoulders were in the other direction, and when Jamison tried to get at his man, he had to run around Sessions. It worked (but didn’t result in points because Semih Erdan just used the Cavs’ foul-to-give on Blake before he could get a shot up), and it was great way to use Griffin’s speed to get him moving toward the basket in space. Austin Carr pointed out that it functioned like a pick play in football, which is true. He also called it a “dribble entry pass” (?) and said it was a throwback, but it seems to me that this play was just Vince Del Black putting in a play based on some dribble drive principles. The twist was using Griffin in the second dribble-driver guard spot and using Blake’s lack of range to suck Jamison into the play. 
John Calipari Pizza: Very super greasy pizza
-greg

Personal Pan Power Rankings #2 is second in a series of pizza topping- and NBA-themed power rankings. A Personal Pan ‘Za only has four slices, probably (has an adult ever ordered one? I’m trying to remember my childhood), so this feature ranks only four things.

Personal Pan Power Rankings #1

#4: Blake Griffin’s Use of the Rim on Reverse Layups

Though he’s technically a big man, Lake Griffin is so athletic that it seems at least once a game he reverse-lays the ball up like a guard or wing would—flying under the rim, baseline, and then hanging in the air so long that he rotates such that he’s facing the rim before putting it in. The acrobatics are necessary because he has to avoid getting blocked, because of his short arms, and possible, because of his absurd leaping and body control. 

Griffin’s height and length in proportion to his leaping and athleticism are like the Golden ratio. He is one of the most aesthetically pleasing players because his physical attributes are just small enough (he’s really a little undersized as a 4) to make his aerial moves look impressive. At the same time, Blake has the body control of, say, Monta Ellis (well, maybe not quite) and his height is enough to allow him to do things a player with that kind of body control (usually a little guy) so rarely does.

Perfectly Proportionate Pizza Topping Flavors: Peppers and Onions

#3: Steve Nash’s All-Star Selection

As of right now (11 Feb), Nash is actually closer to a 60-50-90 season than he is a 50-40-90.

Leads the league in assists. 

His fellow starters are Gortat, Dudley, Hill, and Frye. Without Nash, that team’s…I’m not even going to finish. 

Still a classic a pizza: Pepperoni

#2: Mo Williams’s Desire for a Contract Extension

Mo Williams is agitating for a contract extension. He is signed through next season. 

This year Mo Gotti’s acting like he only has a few years to live, like he can’t achieve his goals quick enough. When he gets into the game, he tries to shoot as many times as he can. When he feels like he’s not in shape, he drops 20 pounds even though now he looks unhealthy. When he agitates for a contract extension, he does it the year before his contract year.

How can anyone blame Mo for becoming a super go-getter? 

Pizza for highly effective people: None, they probably eat salads and grilled chicken

#1: The Clippers’ Using Dribble-Drive Offense Principles

With about 11 seconds to go in the first quarter against the Cavs (8 Feb), Mo Williams (on the right) and Blake Griffin (on the left) set up above the three point line while Gomes, Foye and Evans stood out of the way on the baseline (Gomes and Foye spotted up in the corners, Evans on the left a outside the paint). Antawn Jamison played off Griffin and was set up on the free throw line. Mo dribbled hard middle directly at Jamison to create a three man cluster at the FT line (Mo, Jamison, and Mo’s man, Ramon Sessions). Right after Mo started his drive, Blake broke toward the same area but stayed a few feet behind; Mo hit him with a bounce pass. Sessions couldn’t switch on to Griffin because his momentum, hips, and shoulders were in the other direction, and when Jamison tried to get at his man, he had to run around Sessions. It worked (but didn’t result in points because Semih Erdan just used the Cavs’ foul-to-give on Blake before he could get a shot up), and it was great way to use Griffin’s speed to get him moving toward the basket in space. Austin Carr pointed out that it functioned like a pick play in football, which is true. He also called it a “dribble entry pass” (?) and said it was a throwback, but it seems to me that this play was just Vince Del Black putting in a play based on some dribble drive principles. The twist was using Griffin in the second dribble-driver guard spot and using Blake’s lack of range to suck Jamison into the play. 

John Calipari Pizza: Very super greasy pizza

-greg

Posted on February 11th, 2012