PRIMO BASKETBALL CONTENT
Monta Ellis and Steph Curry coexist so strangely that last night I did this; I didn’t gain the clarity I hoped to. 
Their untenableness as an effective backcourt informs any discussion of elliscurry. Every time someone writes, speaks, or thinks about them, he is trying to clarify which one should be traded. This doesn’t mean he is trying to figure out which one is better, just which one is best to move in service of Golden State’s future. 
Both Curry and Ellis are combo guards. Put another way: Both Curry and Ellis are basketball deviants. The general trajectory for combo guards is to start for awhile on bad teams (when observers wait with baited breath to see if he shifts his game toward a more conventional 1 or 2) until they get old enough to become a bench scorer (when observers begin loving him because he’s now filling a more tried-and-true role). Elliscurry is thus doubly deviant: Two combo guards in one backcourt? And this double-deviancy is so novel that it hasn’t been understood. And this lack of understanding is why one of them hasn’t yet been moved. At least, that’s what I choose to believe.
Every behavior is a deviancy until people see that it fits somewhere in the world. I like to think that Riley, Lacob, and Jackson get together every off day and do what I did last night—turn toward the mystical. I like to think that they get together every off day and study chaos theory, or at least get out the Ouja, and then try to conceive of possible realities in which elliscurry could become the soul of a 55-win team; they try to find the place that the elliscurry deviancy might fit in civilized society.
I like to think that that is why elliscurry hasn’t been exploded, even though Occam’s razor might argue instead that it’s simply because the right deal hasn’t come along. And I like to think that because…well, what if elliscurry could be the soul of a 55-win team? Then we’d understand something that we couldn’t conceive of before.
-greg

Monta Ellis and Steph Curry coexist so strangely that last night I did this; I didn’t gain the clarity I hoped to. 

Their untenableness as an effective backcourt informs any discussion of elliscurry. Every time someone writes, speaks, or thinks about them, he is trying to clarify which one should be traded. This doesn’t mean he is trying to figure out which one is better, just which one is best to move in service of Golden State’s future. 

Both Curry and Ellis are combo guards. Put another way: Both Curry and Ellis are basketball deviants. The general trajectory for combo guards is to start for awhile on bad teams (when observers wait with baited breath to see if he shifts his game toward a more conventional 1 or 2) until they get old enough to become a bench scorer (when observers begin loving him because he’s now filling a more tried-and-true role). Elliscurry is thus doubly deviant: Two combo guards in one backcourt? And this double-deviancy is so novel that it hasn’t been understood. And this lack of understanding is why one of them hasn’t yet been moved. At least, that’s what I choose to believe.

Every behavior is a deviancy until people see that it fits somewhere in the world. I like to think that Riley, Lacob, and Jackson get together every off day and do what I did last night—turn toward the mystical. I like to think that they get together every off day and study chaos theory, or at least get out the Ouja, and then try to conceive of possible realities in which elliscurry could become the soul of a 55-win team; they try to find the place that the elliscurry deviancy might fit in civilized society.

I like to think that that is why elliscurry hasn’t been exploded, even though Occam’s razor might argue instead that it’s simply because the right deal hasn’t come along. And I like to think that because…well, what if elliscurry could be the soul of a 55-win team? Then we’d understand something that we couldn’t conceive of before.

-greg

Posted on February 1st, 2012